Essential Things to Consider Before Buying an RV

Since I’ve been considering RV living for quite some time, (it’s even on my bucket list!), I think this information will help both people like me and those interested in using a recreational vehicle for… well, recreation!

Traveling in an RV has to be one of the best ways to see the US, as well as the rest of the world. It appeals to a lot of people who want the freedom of camping but with a bit more comfort. An RV gives you transportation and accommodation all in one, so you don’t have to worry about booking hotels or even finding restaurants. You can plan your trip by choosing the places you want to stop, never having to see the same place twice. However, it’s not for everyone, and you shouldn’t jump straight into buying an RV. Before you make a decision, consider these important factors.

File:RV Camper at North Toledo Bend State Park.jpgSource: Alex Demyan

Will You Enjoy the Drive?

Before you go ahead and buy an RV, you have to decide if it’s right for you. Some people enjoy the journey while they’re traveling, but others want to get from A to B as soon as possible. If you don’t like taking your time to move from place to place, you probably won’t like traveling in an RV. And if you don’t enjoy driving, it’s probably not a good idea to get behind the wheel of one. If you’re not sure whether you would like it or not, there’s one simple solution. You should start by hiring an RV so you can test it out. You can try the lifestyle of living on the road and stopping at various locations. You might discover that you love it, or it could leave you feeling disappointed. You won’t know until you try.

Who Is Coming Along for the Ride?

It’s essential to consider who is going to travel with you in your RV. Some people travel alone with a small trailer and enjoy their own company. Others go as a couple, particularly retired couples who love having adventures together. You can also travel as a family, with the kids, dog, and maybe even the cat in the back. It’s important to think about who’s coming with you because you’re going to be stuck with them. Although you can go and do your own things when you stop, it’s difficult to get away from each other when you’re driving. You need to think about how much space you need, as well as what facilities matter to you.

Are You Interested in Long or Short Trips?

An RV can take you almost anywhere, from the next town over to all the way across the country. If you rent an RV, you can drive one anywhere in the world. You should think about whether you’re interested in going on long or short trips in an RV. Of course, if you’re planning on long ones, you might enjoy shorter trips in between your epic journeys. It’s important to think about this because it could influence the type of RV you buy or rent. A smaller one with fewer features might not be suitable for people who want to go on longer trips.

Size and Budget

It probably won’t surprise you that the size of an RV affects its price. The bigger you’re looking at, the more expensive it’s going to cost. You have to consider how much you’re willing to spend, how much space you need, and how long your RV will last. There are several types of motor home you can look at. At the top of the scale, you’ll find huge Class A motor homes, which many people will only dream of owning. They can cost as much as a house, and with good reason. They can have several slide-out sections to maximize spaces and lots of amenities. Some even have space for a car inside them.

File:'06-'07 Ford E-350 (1-800-RV-4-RENT).JPGSource: Bull-Doser

If your budget is more modest, you’re more likely to look at travel trailers and fifth wheels. These hitch onto trucks and SUVs to make transporting your RV easy. You could even get a pop-up trailer, which is lighter and more compact. Another option to consider is sport utility RVs, which are sometimes called toy haulers. They have space in the rear where you can fit a motorcycle, canoe, or even a small boat. If you’re on a tight budget, you might even consider a truck camper. It goes in the bed of your truck to give you features such as a kitchen, shower, and bedroom. However, it’s much cheaper than a motorhome.

Maintaining an RV

It’s essential to remember that owning a motorhome isn’t just a one-time investment. They need to be cared for, which also costs money. If you think that keeping your car maintained is expensive, you could be in for a shock if something is wrong with your RV. Luckily, just like with your car, you can learn to take care of your RV on your own. You don’t necessarily need a mechanic to help you out. Using sites like http://www.stlrv.net/st-louis-rv-parts-for-sale, you can buy any parts you need. You can save a lot of money by doing the work yourself. Finding someone to fix your RV can be difficult because they need to have space for it. If you do want a professional to repair it, look for somewhere that specializes in motorhomes.

Other Running Costs

Maintenance of your RV isn’t the only expense you need to be concerned about. You need to consider other costs too. Go to http://www.kiplinger.com/article/retirement/ to see some of the extra costs involved. For example, there’s the price of fuel. How many miles per gallon are you going to get from your motorhome? You also need to think about where to park your RV when you’re not driving it. There are lots of homeowner’s associations and the like which do not allow you to park a motorhome. You can find a specialist place to keep it, but you will have to pay a monthly fee. Then there’s insurance, which will cost you more if you have a larger RV. Plus, you might want to stay connected while you’re on the road. You could be paying for things like satellite or wireless internet so you can make phone calls and watch TV.

There’s a lot to think about before you start traveling in an RV. It’s not all about the travel itself, and it’s important to keep finances in mind.

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Transitioning to Travel Life

I’m going to guess that most people reading this don’t get to travel like it’s a full-time job, likely because they have a full-time job. However, many travel bloggers you can find on the internet do get to travel full-time, or at least most-of-the-time.

I am not one of those bloggers.

Although I was basically jobless for the three months I backpacked Europe (I made a little from freelance writing, but probably under $100), I have spent the rest of my adulthood scheduling travel around work. If I didn’t work, I couldn’t travel.

Now I’m thinking that most of you readers can relate to me better.

Most of the best travel blogs out there are written by people who travel like it’s their job, because it IS their job. When they go over how they manage things, it’s a little hard for the rest of us to relate.

I’d like to try something on this blog over the next few months that I’ve never seen successfully completed on other “indie” travel blogs. Instead of waiting until I am successful to tell you about my success, we’re going to start with explaining what I’m doing right here, right now.

Web Marketing for Booking Site

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I booked this stay at Sacramento International Hostel through Hostelz.com!

I got my newest job just a week ago! I now work for Hostelz.com as a web marketer. I’ve written hostel reviews and location descriptions for this site for years now, so it’s nice to finally work for them for more substantial pay. The biggest advantage of this job is that while the company is based in Texas, I’ve never been to Texas and won’t have to go there for any work reasons. I can work from anywhere that I can connect to the internet. Another advantage is that part of this job involves visiting travel blogs that I may have not noticed before, so I’m getting some new travel information. Of course, there are downsides, but they’re pretty typical of location-independent work. One thing I’m not sure is an advantage or disadvantage is that I only get paid for completing something. The downside is that, unlike most jobs, I don’t get paid to take breaks. The upside is I have more control over how much I make.

Travel Blogging

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While travel blogging doesn’t earn much, the perks are nice, like getting to review this Ellie Claire journal on my Mediterranean Trek!

This is still definitely more of a hobby, but I try to monetize when I can. For over a year now, I’ve included affiliate links to Hostelz.com, and recently when I’m trying to earn extra money with Swagbucks, although these haven’t been too successful yet. (But I do appreciate when you go through my links to book- it earns me a bit of money with no extra cost to you!)

You may have also noticed that I recently posted my first sponsored post. FatJoe contacted me a few months ago asking if this blog would be willing to host sponsored posts. My initial reaction was worrying that I would end up trapped posting subpar content advertising things I didn’t care about. But when I found out that I had control over what I could accept and that they would only submit things to me when they knew they were relevant for this site, I became more willing. Having only received one post from them over the past few months proves that they know their clients well, but resulted in only a few dollars coming my way.

It’s been somewhat profitable to guest post for other travel blogs. I recently was published for my third time on Travel Fashion Girl. I try not to write for free on blogs unless I can tell it will greatly help with networking. I think TravelingMom has potential for this. I’ve also joined a few travel writing networks such as The Aspiring Travel Writer, which has helped a lot with motivation.

While travel blogging hasn’t done much in terms of finances, it has always been nice to have sponsors!

Non-Travel Writing

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I’ll get to West Monroe, Louisiana eventually. But getting to interview Duck Dynasty stars may be the next best thing.

Who said the digital nomadic life had to be entirely travel-based? While I do write a lot online about travel, much of my writing is about different topics. Some of the recent work I sold will be used in Devozine and Young Salvationist.

I am also the editor of Girlz 4 Christ Magazine, a free magazine for teens. I’ve been working on it for five years as a labor of love, but I’ve been making connections for advertisers and review products. More recently, it seems like it will become more successful financially! As a bonus, I’m able to rework some of my content from this magazine for others. (Anyone want to buy an interview with Duck Dynasty stars John Luke and Mary Kate Robertson?)

Still Working Locally

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Sometimes you can even find faraway lands locally. How about this Japanese garden in Lithia Park?

All of the above is nice, but I’m not ready to leave local work yet. I did, however, leave the job that took up most of my time a week ago. I’m still doing childcare and working at the Magdalene Home.

Right now, I’m not willing to give up local work because of its many intangible benefits! It keeps me better connected and involved in the community. My hours are flexible enough that I can still travel. And of course, it’s nice to have a semi-regular source of income.

And What About Traveling?

Medford Airport to Mediterranean
My backpack and I are always prepped for any adventures offered!

When I moved back to Oregon and started planning my European trip, I thought travel work would go right in hand with actual travel. Not so! Although I haven’t read any other travel bloggers admitting it, I think the secret to location-independent work is to make sure it works at one location before throwing travel into the mix.

So I haven’t done much travel lately, except for local day trips. I do want to make sure that my above location-independent jobs (especially Hostelz.com) are a viable source of income and keep my interest over the long term. Since my disposable income isn’t much right now (mostly because I bought a car), I’m having extra fun researching ways to travel for even less, or maybe free! But just in the past 24 hours, I’ve already started planning two different trips that I can take thanks to this kind of life!

As I continue transitioning to a more travel-oriented life, what details would you like to learn? 

Across the Ocean and Right Next Door

My recent guest posts took me all around the world!

Across the Ocean

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If you’ve ever been to Disneyland or Walt Disney World in the United States, you may wonder if it’s worth going overseas to international Disney parks. Even die-hard Disney fans may want to stick to the original two! When I went to Disneyland Paris, I was pleasantly surprised with the outcome!

My second article on TravelingMom has been posted! It’s all about what you can expect at Disneyland Paris! Click here to read 4 Reasons Why Disneyland Paris Should Be On Every Disney Fan’s Bucket List

Right Next Door

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Do you have a tourist attraction near where you live that you just haven’t visited yet? I’m not above playing tourist in my hometown. I’ve enjoyed historic Jacksonville, hiking places like the Table Rocks, and even Harry & David (although I enjoy that last one less since I worked there). But one attraction I just haven’t made it to is also one of the most widely known: the Pacific Crest Trail. I got to explain why in this collaboration with other travel writers. Do you think what I said was a good reason, or just an excuse?

I will try to hike the PCT soon. (Not the whole thing; just the part near me.) I’ll let you know what I think when I get there!

The Best Ways to Travel in America

If you do a lot of travelling, chances are you like to keep your costs down. Of course, if you’re about to embark on a holiday of a lifetime, you probably want to travel in style. It doesn’t matter whether your journey is made on a budget, or you prefer to enjoy a little luxury on the move. The journey is just as important as the destination. Just think of Route 66! America has plenty of options to help you travel in the way that best suits you. Here are just a few of them:

 

Luxury Limousine

Living the life of a celebrity certainly sounds appealing if you can afford it. A chauffeur driven limo certainly allows you to arrive at your destination in style. You may even turn a few heads. Another benefit of travelling by private limo is that you can tear up your itinerary. Choose where to go and when. Your lift will always be waiting for you. And it will be the most comfortable ride you’ll ever take! Perfect for airport runs and stops around town.

3656956945_bca973b3fd_zPhoto at Flickr.com

 

Train

America is world famous for its railroad services. Whether you’re moving across the country or just taking the subway a couple of stops, the trains are easy for hopping on and off as you need. Many stations are situated in proximity to all the local amenities you may need. Of course, there are times when it’s standing room only. And heavy luggage or backpacks are difficult to manoeuvre through gates at times. Crowding and delays can be a nuisance but it’s cheap enough to make travelling on a budget workable.

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Photo at Flickr.com

 

Charter Bus

If you travel a lot with colleagues, family or friends, it makes sense that you all travel together. A charter bus can be the ideal way to do this. Some must-see cities can be difficult to navigate with a group in any other way. Some companies such as GOGO Charters in Seattle can take you anywhere from the city to the sights. It certainly makes sense to have a door-to-door service when it’s pouring with rain! With local knowledge, having a driver means that you experience fewer delays and some handy tips on what’s best to see and do too.

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Photo at Flickr.com

 

Fly

In the sixties, it was easy to hop on and off internal flights as you needed. These days there are more people travelling, more flights, and much more security. Longer waits at check-in can put some people off. But the beauty of looking out of the window while you’re soaring above the clouds makes it all worthwhile for many. It’s still quicker than driving. But do you really need to be there that fast?

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Photo at Flickr.com

 

RV

While they may be the subject and target of many comedian’s sketches, the trusty RV is still a much-loved way to travel America. Families and retirees love the slower pace of travel and the convenience of bringing your accommodation with you.

 

Travel in the United States can be a lot of fun. You can get anywhere at any pace to suit you. There are choices for the city, choices for seeing the landscape, and choices for comfort. How will you get where you’re going this summer?

 

Note: To keep things legal, I will disclose that this is a sponsored guest post. However, I have tried these methods of travel and can personally recommend that you check them out too! 

 

 

 

Places Change

A little over a year ago, I made a stop at the historic Butte Creek Mill. It hadn’t changed much since it opened in 1872.

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But recently, I was driving through Eagle Point, and decided to make a quick detour to go by Butte Creek Mill. Here’s what it looks like now:

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Christmas morning brought many surprises as usual, but an unexpected and unwanted surprise was hearing the news that this beautiful historic mill caught fire. It was shocking to comprehend that something that had stood the test of time had so suddenly disappeared as it literally went up in smoke.

In the following weeks, residents from my area kept up on the news of what would happen to the site where Butte Creek Mill once stood. I was filled with hope when the owner announced that just enough survived to justify rebuilding and restoring the mill. However, it would take a lot of help. I made a small donation within the month of the fire, but after seeing the burned-down mill with my own eyes, I recently made another donation. You can help rebuild Butte Creek Mill, too! I look forward to the day when Butte Creek Mill once again resembles the top photo!